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Barbie Slave Ship
La Galerie de L'Eglise Saint-Just
5 Pictures

La Galerie de L'Eglise Saint-Just

5 Pictures

Barbie Slave Ship Barbie Slave Ship Barbie Slave Ship Barbie Slave Ship Barbie Slave Ship
Barbie Slave Ship
Barbie Slave Ship 2013

In the solemn atmosphere of the Église Saint-Just, Tom Sachs tells the story of slavery. The impressive model of the Victory, an 18th century ship of the line, epitomises the logic of it. But placed inside the vessel, like slaves on the transatlantic crossing, are Barbie dolls. Tom Sachs’s work takes on the illusory utopias of modernism, the myths of American culture (which for the most part also apply to Europe), and the fables of the consumer society. He views space exploration, Hello Kitty, and slavery through the same sarcastic filter and reveals both their production techniques and the ideology underlying them. By associating slavery with Barbie, he makes a link between the Afro-American slave trade and the absolutism of a human body perfected to the point of disembodiment. The Victory is also the story of the United States, a country whose cultural and economic dominance could never have been achieved without exploiting an imported workforce. If the Americans landed a man on the Moon in 1969, it was because, long before, they had had slaves. Tom Sachs creates the formal language at the moment when he creates the work. The tools he used for building Barbie Slave Ship are enshrined in the ship itself, like precious but ridiculous relics. Sachs’s many-layered stories are cobbled together in a convoluted text that takes us to the edges of the geopolitical world, like a three-master sailing into all the most tragic episodes of History.

L'Eglise Saint-Just


41 rue des Farges
69005, Lyon


Comment y aller
Barbie Slave Ship
Barbie Slave Ship 2013

In the solemn atmosphere of the Église Saint-Just, Tom Sachs tells the story of slavery. The impressive model of the Victory, an 18th century ship of the line, epitomises the logic of it. But placed inside the vessel, like slaves on the transatlantic crossing, are Barbie dolls. Tom Sachs’s work takes on the illusory utopias of modernism, the myths of American culture (which for the most part also apply to Europe), and the fables of the consumer society. He views space exploration, Hello Kitty, and slavery through the same sarcastic filter and reveals both their production techniques and the ideology underlying them. By associating slavery with Barbie, he makes a link between the Afro-American slave trade and the absolutism of a human body perfected to the point of disembodiment. The Victory is also the story of the United States, a country whose cultural and economic dominance could never have been achieved without exploiting an imported workforce. If the Americans landed a man on the Moon in 1969, it was because, long before, they had had slaves. Tom Sachs creates the formal language at the moment when he creates the work. The tools he used for building Barbie Slave Ship are enshrined in the ship itself, like precious but ridiculous relics. Sachs’s many-layered stories are cobbled together in a convoluted text that takes us to the edges of the geopolitical world, like a three-master sailing into all the most tragic episodes of History.

L'Eglise Saint-Just


41 rue des Farges
69005, Lyon


Comment y aller
Barbie Slave Ship
Barbie Slave Ship 2013

In the solemn atmosphere of the Église Saint-Just, Tom Sachs tells the story of slavery. The impressive model of the Victory, an 18th century ship of the line, epitomises the logic of it. But placed inside the vessel, like slaves on the transatlantic crossing, are Barbie dolls. Tom Sachs’s work takes on the illusory utopias of modernism, the myths of American culture (which for the most part also apply to Europe), and the fables of the consumer society. He views space exploration, Hello Kitty, and slavery through the same sarcastic filter and reveals both their production techniques and the ideology underlying them. By associating slavery with Barbie, he makes a link between the Afro-American slave trade and the absolutism of a human body perfected to the point of disembodiment. The Victory is also the story of the United States, a country whose cultural and economic dominance could never have been achieved without exploiting an imported workforce. If the Americans landed a man on the Moon in 1969, it was because, long before, they had had slaves. Tom Sachs creates the formal language at the moment when he creates the work. The tools he used for building Barbie Slave Ship are enshrined in the ship itself, like precious but ridiculous relics. Sachs’s many-layered stories are cobbled together in a convoluted text that takes us to the edges of the geopolitical world, like a three-master sailing into all the most tragic episodes of History.

L'Eglise Saint-Just


41 rue des Farges
69005, Lyon


Comment y aller
Barbie Slave Ship
Barbie Slave Ship 2013

In the solemn atmosphere of the Église Saint-Just, Tom Sachs tells the story of slavery. The impressive model of the Victory, an 18th century ship of the line, epitomises the logic of it. But placed inside the vessel, like slaves on the transatlantic crossing, are Barbie dolls. Tom Sachs’s work takes on the illusory utopias of modernism, the myths of American culture (which for the most part also apply to Europe), and the fables of the consumer society. He views space exploration, Hello Kitty, and slavery through the same sarcastic filter and reveals both their production techniques and the ideology underlying them. By associating slavery with Barbie, he makes a link between the Afro-American slave trade and the absolutism of a human body perfected to the point of disembodiment. The Victory is also the story of the United States, a country whose cultural and economic dominance could never have been achieved without exploiting an imported workforce. If the Americans landed a man on the Moon in 1969, it was because, long before, they had had slaves. Tom Sachs creates the formal language at the moment when he creates the work. The tools he used for building Barbie Slave Ship are enshrined in the ship itself, like precious but ridiculous relics. Sachs’s many-layered stories are cobbled together in a convoluted text that takes us to the edges of the geopolitical world, like a three-master sailing into all the most tragic episodes of History.

L'Eglise Saint-Just


41 rue des Farges
69005, Lyon


Comment y aller
Barbie Slave Ship
Barbie Slave Ship 2013

In the solemn atmosphere of the Église Saint-Just, Tom Sachs tells the story of slavery. The impressive model of the Victory, an 18th century ship of the line, epitomises the logic of it. But placed inside the vessel, like slaves on the transatlantic crossing, are Barbie dolls. Tom Sachs’s work takes on the illusory utopias of modernism, the myths of American culture (which for the most part also apply to Europe), and the fables of the consumer society. He views space exploration, Hello Kitty, and slavery through the same sarcastic filter and reveals both their production techniques and the ideology underlying them. By associating slavery with Barbie, he makes a link between the Afro-American slave trade and the absolutism of a human body perfected to the point of disembodiment. The Victory is also the story of the United States, a country whose cultural and economic dominance could never have been achieved without exploiting an imported workforce. If the Americans landed a man on the Moon in 1969, it was because, long before, they had had slaves. Tom Sachs creates the formal language at the moment when he creates the work. The tools he used for building Barbie Slave Ship are enshrined in the ship itself, like precious but ridiculous relics. Sachs’s many-layered stories are cobbled together in a convoluted text that takes us to the edges of the geopolitical world, like a three-master sailing into all the most tragic episodes of History.

L'Eglise Saint-Just


41 rue des Farges
69005, Lyon


Comment y aller