Lili Reynaud-Dewar

I’m Intact and I Don’t Care
Gallery of Lili Reynaud Dewar
2 Pictures

Gallery of Lili Reynaud Dewar

2 Pictures

I’m Intact and I Don’t Care I’m Intact and I Don’t Care
I’m Intact and I Don’t Care
I’m Intact and I Don’t Care 2013

Lili Reynaud-Dewar maps out oblique perspectivesthat relate her position as an artist to the emblematicfigures involved in the fight for racial equality and the assertion of identity. She constructs formal, fictional and symbolic relations between them. In pointing up these invisible connections between the perception of certain public figures and her own biography, she dramatises the media forces and the taken-for granted image they reflect. For the Biennale, Lili Reynaud-Dewar is presenting a new installation, which gives symbolic substance to the notion of a room: “A Room of One’s Own” in Virginia Woolf’s phrase, aroom in which to find refuge, a room to live in, albeit briefly. The narrative tension that the artist creates comes from the enigmatic presences that seem to float about rather than inhabit this room. In a set of performances enacted by her and presented on ascreen, Reynaud-Dewar references issues of cultural transformation and the impossibility of maintaining afixed identity.

Le Musée d'art contemporain


81 Quai Charles de Gaulle
69006, Lyon


Comment y aller
I’m Intact and I Don’t Care
I’m Intact and I Don’t Care 2013

Lili Reynaud-Dewar maps out oblique perspectivesthat relate her position as an artist to the emblematicfigures involved in the fight for racial equality and the assertion of identity. She constructs formal, fictional and symbolic relations between them. In pointing up these invisible connections between the perception of certain public figures and her own biography, she dramatises the media forces and the taken-for granted image they reflect. For the Biennale, Lili Reynaud-Dewar is presenting a new installation, which gives symbolic substance to the notion of a room: “A Room of One’s Own” in Virginia Woolf’s phrase, aroom in which to find refuge, a room to live in, albeit briefly. The narrative tension that the artist creates comes from the enigmatic presences that seem to float about rather than inhabit this room. In a set of performances enacted by her and presented on ascreen, Reynaud-Dewar references issues of cultural transformation and the impossibility of maintaining afixed identity.

Le Musée d'art contemporain


81 Quai Charles de Gaulle
69006, Lyon


Comment y aller